This Week At Angama #97 - Angama Mara

This Week At Angama #97

13 December 2019 | This Week At Angama |

Reading Time: 5 minutes

It’s always exciting when the elusive leopard makes an appearance, but that was just the start of a week filled with satisfied predators with plenty to eat

It had been several months since I had last seen a leopard, so when I heard a radio call that one had been spotted along the river bank, I promptly left the lion sighting I had stopped at, in search of the beautiful and elusive cat. A personal favourite of mine. [f 6.3, 1/80, ISO 1600   -0.67]

Lion stretching

This is one of two males often spotted near the river in the Kichwa Tembo area. Not too far from him was a leopard just across the river. [f 5.0, 1/125, ISO 500 -0.67]

lions sleeping

Near the Serena airstrip, I caught up with four sleeping lions. I decided to wait a while, hoping one of would eventually start to move around. [f 5.0, 1/800, ISO 400 +0.33]

Lionesses

After about 20 minutes, one of the lionesses stood up and walked into the longer grass. The rest raised their heads, watching her. [f 5.0, 1/1600, ISO 400 -0.33]

lions searching

Stealthy stalking, the lioness edged closer and closer to her prey. [f 5.3, 1/1000, ISO 400 -0.33]

lioness standing

As the lioness stalked I searched with my binocularss but could not see her potential target. As soon as the first female stood up, the others saw the prey and immediately headed towards her. Their sense of sight is amazing. [f 5.6, 1/1000, ISO 400  -0.33]

lioness pounce

Ambush! A chase ensued. [f 5.6, 1/1600, ISO 400  -0.33]

lioness chasing warthog

It was all over in just 20 seconds as the female successfully caught a young warthog. [f 6.3, 1/800, ISO 400  -0.33]

lioness with warthog

Straight after the kill, all the others joined in and started tearing the warthog apart. The warthog mother watched on in the background. [6.3  1/640, ISO 400 -0.33]

Hyenas and carcass

Last week, a hippo died due to the high water levels, but no animals could reach it aside from vultures and marabou storks. One evening when the water was low, lions came and feasted on it the carcass all night before leaving it the next morning. [f 5.0,  1/200, ISO 500  -0.33]

Hyena and hippo carcass

This hyena saw the opportunity and helped finish off the carcass. Along with him, about fifty vultures. [f 5.0, 1/1000, ISO 400  -0.33]

Hyena and marabou stork

The hyena knew that lions had been there not too long ago, so every few minutes he’d stop eating and just scan the area before diving back in. [f 6.0, 1/160, ISO 400 ]

Hyena eating black and white

A dramatic black-and-white shot of the hyena enjoying his feast. [f 6.3, 1/320, ISO 640]

Eland

Misty, moody mornings continued this week, providing amazing opportunities for unusual abstract shots. [f 6.0, 1/125, ISO 500 -0.67]

Buffalo

This buffalo was such a character. When the rest of the herd ran away, as I pulled closer, he stood in place and gave a few nice poses. [f 5.6, 1/200, ISO 400 -1.33] 

Buffalo black and white

A black-and-white shot of the same buffalo. [f 6.0, 1/250, ISO 400 -1.33]

Gazelle

Graceful grazers. [f 5.0, 1/320, ISO 400 -0.67]

Lilac roller

The beautiful lilac-breasted roller looking its best. [f 5.6, 1/200, ISO 400 -1.33]

coucal

Another bird I enjoyed photographing was the white-browed coucal. Posing ever-so elegantly for the picture. [f 6.3, 1/1600, ISO 400 -1.33] 

moody skies

As the rain has continued to fall this week, the clouds have been amazing, making for dramatic landscape shots. Here are a few of my favourites [f 5.0, 1/4000, ISO 400]

cloudy skies

[f 5.0, 1/3200, ISO 400]

landscape

[f 5.0, 1/3200, ISO 400  +0.33]

cloudy skies

[f 5.0, 1/8000, ISO 400 -1.33]

This week a year ago

Leopard in tree

Lucky as a leprechaun, a few meters from the buffalo, a female leopard rested well concealed in a tree. I simply could not believe our luck. Minutes later she started calling. She climbed down from the tree and into the lugga to her tiny cubs, and they all disappeared in the bushes. [f 5.6, 1/200, ISO 250]

Photograph by Jeffrey Thige

AUTHOR: Jeffrey Thige

Hailing from Nairobi, Jeff’s younger years were spent watching Big Cat Diaries with his mother. Images of wild animals roaming across the savanna inspired Jeff to travel the country, study wildlife management and move into photography. Jeff aims to use his camera to become an ambassador for conservation. He joined Angama Mara as an intern in 2018 and is now employed full time as assistant photographer at the lodge’s Photographic Studio.

COMMENTS (1)
Alyssa
December 13, 2019

How exciting to see Maridadi close to the Mara Triangle, that is the female you have posted on the first photo. She is a daughter of Kaboso so she has traveled quite a bit to get to where you have seen her.

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